Can’t find the right baubles in the shops this year? Why not make your own using fabric? This is a great way to re-use old clothes, perhaps from baby clothes as a lovely reminder or treat yourself to some Designer Christmas Fabrics from online retailer higgs and higgs who have a huge variety of festive fabric.

What you’ll need:

PVA glue and a paintbrush

Polystyrene balls

Fabric of your choice

Ribbon

  • You’ll need something to stand your balls on, so they don’t keep rolling away! A candle holder is an ideal choice. Glue on one square of fabric, smooth it out and glue on a piece of ribbon across the top for hanging purposes. Create a loop with the ribbon.
  • To hold the ribbon out the way to dry, use a clothes peg.
  • Glue on two pieces of fabric either side to hold the ribbon in place.
  • Continue gluing on little overlapping pieces of fabric until the ball is completely covered.
  • Allow to dry.
  • Once fully dry, cover the bauble with a protective layer of glue and allow that to dry.
  • Now repeat the process to create lots more lovely hanging fabric baubles!

Fabric baubles are the perfect solution if you don’t want plastic or glass ornaments on your tree. Perhaps you have a curious toddler or a mischievous puppy or kitten who won’t leave the tree alone. Maybe you’re worried about glass ornaments breaking and being harmful. That’s why fabric baubles are such a great idea.

Baubles are traditionally from Germany as the idea came from the area of Lauscha from a man named Hans Greiner. He first started to manufacture baubles in the 1840s. The first to be made were glass and in the shape of nuts or fruit. The design then evolved into a more spherical shape.

Queen Victoria was rather fond of these trinkets and brought the tradition to England during the mid to late 19th century. Baubles began to appear in America when F.W Woolworth began importing them in 1880 and a decade later, he was selling $25 million worth every year!

The first baubles were handcrafted from glass so reserved only for the wealthiest in society. Thankfully, cheaper plastic ones started to be manufactured, opening up the bauble market for everyone. Did you know that it was Queen Victoria who started the idea of it being bad luck to keep your decorations past 5th January? This is a tradition that many people still adhere to today.