If you currently work within the air carrier industry or are planning to, then you should be aware of an airside pass. But what should you know and how do you obtain one? Airport security

Airports, understandably, have had to steadily increase security over the past few years more than most environments. This is due to heightened security threat levels, and each zone now requires different checks for employees. For example, the US is implementing additional checks and a ban on travelling with laptops.

Areas covered by certain passes change, but basic restricted zone passes are required for access near aircraft.

Airside passes are required for a range of roles, from duty-free staff to aeroplane food caterers and aircraft marshals.

What is an airside pass?

An airside pass is often issued as a card or electronic key, allowing access and identification in restricted areas.

Airside pass requirements

What most airports require is that employees working in sensitive or restricted areas are identified and do not have a conviction or criminal record.

The checks can include security interviews, but are primarily identity and address checks through employment histories and qualification referencing. This process is intended to prove you are who you claim to be, which is straightforward for most. However, those with name changes may find it slightly more complicated. Address checks are designed to prove your home location for the past five years, with a similar history required for employment checks.

Any gaps caused by education or study periods must be explained. Certain convictions or criminal records are not desirable for working airside, and airports may also require a basic DBS check, such as those carried out by http://www.carecheck.co.uk/basic-dbs-checks/.

Enhanced checks may also need to be carried out for working in more sensitive areas. However, a criminal record may not block the acquisition of an airside pass, more vital is the severity of sentence and the offence committed.

How to get an airside pass

For most UK airport contractors and employers there is a designated procedure for airside pass applications. It is not generally possible to apply on your own behalf for an airside pass, as there must be a valid reason and sponsorship from an organisation.

The application will normally be processed by an ID centre specialising in background vetting.