When buying a park home it is important to understand that the ownership rules differ from more traditional bricks and mortar properties.

Your first port of call to understand the differences is the government’s own website covering this property sector. This refers to the 1983 Mobile Homes Act last updated in 2015.

Community

There are many reasons to consider a park home, you may be downsizing or looking to join a community of like-minded people.

There are many options when looking at residential park homes, including those found at sites such as http://www.parkhomelife.com/.

Wherever you choose to purchase, the site will have specific rules, but park home owners will be expected to comply with some simple common rules. These will be set out in the written agreement which the park owner will provide, and you will have 28 days to peruse the document before signing and certain rights are established by law.

Park home residents cannot be evicted without a court order or be harassed into giving up their home. You will also retain the right to sell your property.

The park owner must not give any misleading information which impacts the sale of your park home, nor do they have the right to approve potential buyers. You also have the right to put the property on sale at any time without consulting the site owner. During the process you have the right to choose an estate agent to market the property and a conveyancer to act on your behalf free of interference.

Amenities

When it comes to amenities charges, the site owner must not place a levy or surcharge on the price they are charged for the services, although LPG prices are not subject to the same regulations.

Meanwhile, you will be required to follow the site rules which are included in your written agreement or indicated by on-site signage. Pitch fees will also be indicated in the agreement, and any amendment must be indicated to you by written notice, with a pitch fee review form.

A residents’ association can be set up to negotiate with the site owner provided it meets certain criteria.

Site owners must keep common areas in good repair and give notice of any improvements planned and in case of disputes a tribunal may be available to settle the matter.